FOC101-Summer 2015 - ABC Computers Caselet Questions

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  • 24 May 2015 17:55
    Reply # 3353837 on 3347609
    Deleted user
    Palmer Attias

    1. What happened at ABC Computers that led to such a disappointing turn of events (e.g., high employee turn over, disengaged employees, etc.)?
    ABC Computers upper management failed to understand the frustration of the Japanese work force and the validity of there complaints.  The workers where outperforming there western counterparts and earning more than double for the company in most cases.  Not only where the Japanese workers not paid more they where not even acknowledged for there hard work and better performance.  When the Japanese workers complained to management they where repeatedly ignored and became discouraged and frustrated.  Management did not make them feel like they where worth the time or money and did not even extend a simple thank you.   Workers became upset, discouraged and for lack of a better word disgusted and became lethargic or quit.


    2. What can you learn from this case study that you can apply to your own organization?

    The art of listening to others is very important as well as giving credit where credit is due.  Not acknowledging or validating employee concerns can disenfranchise them and lead them to look else where for other opportunitys.  I would create incentives to let my workers know that there hard work and superior performance does deserve if not monetary rewards than at least verbal acknowledgement of a job well done.



    3. If you are in Tanaka-san's shoes, what would you recommend to the management of ABC Computers? I would recommend that they formally apologize for not realizing earlier how great a job there employees where doing and offer them a bonus for there hard work. I would also let the employees know that there thoughts matter and upper management is going to make an extra effort to listen to there concerns and ideas in the future.  Compensation as we learned in class is a tool for communication and in this case the management was communicating that they did not care or would not reward extra effort. 


  • 25 May 2015 10:42
    Reply # 3354278 on 3353340
    Blain Keller wrote:Thanks everyone for your insightful answers! I enjoyed reading them as well.

    Jingjing:

    Just out of curiosity, would you happen to know why your company does ES surveys every 3-4 years? My organization does a ES survey for my position once every year; however, since I work for the public sector, I am not sure if conducting ES surveys every 3-4 years is common in the private sector. Do you feel that this time frame is satisfactory or do you believe that these types of surveys should be conducted on a more frequent basis at your company?


    Hi Blain, 

    My apologies for the wrong information, it was actually carried out every 2-3 years. And I guess the reason behind this frequency is because of the company's mid-term management plan which changes every 3 years. In addition, this survey is done worldwide (which therefore includes our subsidiaries in Europe, America and Asia regions), therefore the questions used are not specific to positions like yours.  

    I do think this timeframe is suitable since the management (besides the HR department) needs time to think about policies to address the outstanding issues as a whole. Afterwhich, it escalates down to the different regions where they can then implement initiatives they deem fit. 

    However, if there were surveys targeted at each position (or in terms of job grade), I guess doing it every year sounds logical!

    Last modified: 25 May 2015 10:43 | Jingjing
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